Motocross Elite Review

When I was just a wee lad, during the summers, my dad and I would go to a massive BMX dirt-bike obstacle course and watch the absolute insanity of these daredevils running over giant piles of dirt, popping wheelies, flying through the air, performing crazy aerial stunts and generally doing things on bikes that usually required onsite EMTs. Now all these years later comes Motocross Elite, a game that seeks to recreate the feeling of those muddy, acrobatic daredevils. And it does a fairly good job of doing just that.

Playing Motocross Elite is a bit like playing Tiny Wings (it even shares the same graphical style and muted color palette). You run your dirt bike over hills, ramping up speed and flying all over the screen trying to beat the eccentric cast of other racers (devils, ghosts, invisible racers, monsters, and zombies) who are trying to make you eat their dirt.

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Just like Tiny Wings, flow and precision is key with Motocross Elite. Hitting the hills in the right way is the only way to make it successfully through each race. Hit a hill in the wrong way, or fail to handle a hazard correctly (like mud traps) and your flow can stop, your progress can slow and in some instances can even cause you to crash and lose the race. Certain slopes can give you a big boost if you hit them the right way, and others can stop you cold if you miss the mark, even by a hair. Some courses require such precision that even one split-second misstep can cost you.

Winning races gets you gold that you can use to upgrade your bike with new engines, tires, shocks and costumes for your racer. You also get gold for performing stunts during the course of the race. You can use real-world money to get more gold, but upgrading my bike wasn’t ever a problem. You’d really only need to buy extra gold if you want the really high end stuff like a super-charged bike or some of the more exotic costumes available.

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If I have any real complaints with Motocross Elite it’s that the game is over too quickly, it took me slightly less than two hours to beat the entire game. Unless FunGenerationLab has a ridiculous number of updates planned, and since there isn’t any multiplayer, Motocross Elite isn’t likely to have very long legs.

It also has some bizarre difficulty spikes. You can go from a race that’s super easy and doesn’t seem like a challenge at all and then move straight to a race that seems nigh impossible with jumps and challenges that seem to defy all manner of skill. It can all get a bit annoying at times when you’re motoring right along and then hit a literal and figurative wall.

Motocross Elite isn’t going to win any awards for originality, but it is a fun and engaging diversion for a few hours. It’s no Joe Danger, or even MotoHeroz, but Motocross Elite is an easy, breezy, muddy blast.

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