MapleStory Cygnus Knights Edition Review

In general, Korean RPGs appeal to a certain type of gamer– the kind who doesn’t mind doing the same thing over and over again. That’s exactly what you get in MapleStory Cygnus Knights Edition; fetch quests are the name of the game, and you spend nearly all of your time running errands for the characters you meet. Kill a certain number of enemies for this person, collect a certain number of items for that person. Along the way you’ll do plenty of button-mashing and leveling up, but there’s not much here to keep you playing if grinding isn’t your thing.

Similar to last year’s MapleStory Thief Edition, you’re limited in your choice of class in this game, although you get two specialties to choose from: Soul Master or Flame Wizard. The characters have separate storylines and special abilities, so there’s some inherent replay value if you beat the game and want more. Unfortunately, the story isn’t the game’s strong point.

Hadouken!

The real meat of the game is the fighting, of which there’s plenty. For hours on end, you’ll use weapons and magic to plow through enemies in many colorful side-scrolling environments. Like all RPGs, each kill gives you experience points, which level you up and let you boost your stats and increase your spells and abilities. These abilities can be assigned to hot buttons on the main screen so they’re easy to use during battle. All of this is very standard action-RPG stuff, but the game implements it well.

But that doesn’t mean there aren’t any problems. There’s not much of a tutorial, so you’ll spend a lot of time tapping through menus to see what options are available to you, and talking to townspeople to figure out what all the stations in the towns do. There’s a mailbox, an item capsule, and an empty treasure chest, and figuring out how and why to use them takes some experimentation.

Ever heard of a hyphen?

Also, the developers should have put more effort into bringing this game to Western audiences. The storyline is full of random twists and populated with wooden characters. And the word bubbles in the game have been implemented so lazily that words cut off abruptly at the end of a line and continue on the line below, making text somewhat tricky to read.

Worse yet, the controls are stiff, so you’ll often miss platforms or vines that you’re trying to jump on when navigating the environments. And the controls for a particular jumping minigame are so bad that it’s like playing a version of Doodle Jump that was made by someone who hates you and wants to drive you insane. But the biggest problem with the game is that grinding through oceans of respawning enemies just isn’t very fun without a decent story pulling you through.

If you’re someone who enjoys level grinding and completing fetch quests, these cons can be overlooked. After all, you get hours and hours of content for very little money. But if you’re not interested in a grind, we’d suggest a more well-rounded RPG like Chaos Rings Ω or Aralon.

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