Hell Yeah! Pocket Inferno Review

The strange and cartoonishly violent downloadable game Hell Yeah! Wrath of the Dead Rabbit seemed like it could make a good fit on the iPad and iPhone. So it’s especially bewildering that Sega didn’t release a straightforward port. Instead, the publisher pulled a totally different dead rabbit out of their hat. Taking the same path as Ubisoft did with Rayman Jungle Run, Sega has released another forced scrolling runner, but it’s lacking in a lot of the polish of its competition.

There are two controls here. Tap the left side of the screen to make the dead rabbit’s hovercraft ascend, let off to descend, and tap on the right to shoot. The game has a sort of old-school shooter feel and some humorous character designs throughout. The overall premise of an angry, psychotic, and skeletal bunny trying to escape hell is fun as well. It’s just a shame there isn’t more going on here.

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Obstacles constantly block the way, be they enemies, spinning blades, destructible blocks, or boss monsters. The animation is fairly light and lifeless, and the levels are particularly bland and lacking in detail. It feels a bit amateurish and uninspired, which is bizarre given that the original game’s main strength was its personality and art design.

There are around 50 levels and over 30 monsters to kill across five worlds. The backdrops change, but the action stays consistent throughout and the strangely unresponsive physics give the controls a floaty feeling. Since much of the game is quickly avoiding enemy fire or paths that suddenly end, imprecise controls are a frustrating hassle. After a few levels players will likely get the hang of compensating for this issue, but it never stops being annoying.

Frustration with the controls is heightened thanks to the one-hit kill nature of your character as well. Granted, one-hit death is a typical facet of this sort of game. Hell Yeah! isn’t particularly awful– it’s just not very good. The level design, animation, and controls are lackluster and the end result is a game that feels rushed.

  • http://twitter.com/ETC37 Erik Carlson

    You would have though that Sega would have learned their lesson after the critical drubbing that the first one got. Guess not.