Family Guy: The Quest for Stuff Review

Read the words “Family Guy iOS game” and not very pleasant things come to mind. For that matter, take out the “iOS” and an even bleaker picture comes to mind. It’s safe to say that the entire history of Family Guy video games is filled with unimpressive and uninspired titles. 

Thankfully, the newest iOS Family Guy game, entitled Family Guy: The Quest for Stuff and developed by TinyCo, Inc., is anything but uninspired. In fact, it is quite inspired by another iOS game, The Simpsons: Tapped Out. I really don’t need to go into just how heavily The Quest for Stuff borrows from Tapped Out, because it’s more or less the same game with a Family Guy coat of paint. I’m sure that’s oversimplifying things just a bit, but TinyCo definitely had the Simpsons game in mind when developing this one.

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They even start with a similar premise. In the Simpsons game, Homer is goofing off on the job when Springfield gets nuked, and you have to rebuild it from scratch. In The Quest for Stuff, Peter destroys Quahog while fighting his feathered arch nemisis, and you have to rebuild it from scratch. The intro animation is actually one of the highlights of the game, and when it transitions from the cartoon to the actual game and Peter is still fighting the chicken, there is hope that this is going to be a really great game.

But their fight soon ends and you are quickly thrown into the meat of the game, which is building, unlocking characters, having the characters perform various signature actions, and then receiving money and experience points for those actions. The experience eventually levels up your characters, enabling them to perform more lucrative actions, and the money is used for building more stuff. The more buildings you have, the more money and experience you can accumulate, and it all feeds back into allowing you to expand your own Quahog and eventually collect all 18 characters.

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If it all sounds like a grind, that’s because it IS a grind. There is another form of currency called Golden Clams. You can use these to speed up building or immediately finish a character’s action and get the rewards right away. As you can guess, though, the only way to have enough of these clams to make them useful is to spend real money. Many of the cooler items in the game can only be bought with clams, so if you don’t plan to spend any money on this game, there is a ton of stuff you will never see.

In addition, without an abundance of clams, prepare to wait, wait, and waaaaaaaaaaait for your characters to finish their tasks. Not that you have to stare at them the whole time while your device’s battery runs dry, but it gets to the point where you’ll have nothing to do but log on every few hours to check the status of whether or not Jerome is done combing his afro, Bonnie is done drinking her bottle of wine, Chris is done with “private time,” or Peter and Quagmire are done “dude-spooning.”

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As you can tell from these examples, the actions in The Quest for Stuff range from being funny, to absurd, to very “mature rated”. Not that you should expect anything else from a Family Guy game. It’s these actions that give this game much of its life. How much life that is for you depends on how much of a fan of Family Guy you are, and whether the freemium model and wait times turn you off from unlocking all of the game’s content.

One thought on “Family Guy: The Quest for Stuff Review

  1. Do
    NOT play “Family Guy: Quest for more stuff. Not only have they not
    written “future levels” to unlock, they have not even written the
    current levels they advertise as being already in the game. If you
    spend one dime on this game to purchase one single clam, you have been
    robbed. Period.

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