Edge Extended Review

You wouldn’t think that a video game character who’s a literal square would be able to get in any kind of deep trouble. After all, if a cube can even clunk along in an isometric puzzle world, it’s more than anyone expects of it. But Mobigame’s Edge, initially released in 2008, became embroiled in a legal battle courtesy of one Tim Langdell who believed he could trademark the term “Edge” for his company, Edge Games.

Long, insufferable story made short, Mobigame’s Edge flickered on and off the App Store for legal reasons until Langdell tried to sue EA over “Mirror’s Edge,” and lost his pants. The word “Edge” was restored to the digital kingdom, and Mobigame’s now-famous platformer/puzzle title is a permanent fixture on the App Store. Moreover, fans of the original game can now indulge in Edge Extended. It is time to revel in our freedom to use the word “Edge,” and there’s no better game to clink beer mugs with.

Edge Extended isn’t a direct follow up to the original Edge. It is, as the title suggests, and extension of the first game. However, Edge Extended isn’t a piddly upgrade. You’ll get new music, 44 new levels, and, if you beat those levels, you’ll get the opportunity to race against your “ghost.”

Rolling in the deep.

Otherwise, Edge Extended plays like its predecessor. You must maneuver your cube buddy through several three-dimensional mazes to reach the end as quickly as possible. Along the way, you boost your ranking by picking up shiny prisms, and by avoiding dropping off the edge of the maze into the black void.

Each maze is cleverly built, and you can count on levels offering a different kind of challenge from one to the other. Some will take you seconds to clear; others, a good few minutes. Cube can climb walls that are as high as him (unless he gets shrunk down, after which he can merrily bolt up any wall), but he’ll have to get smart about scaling tall cliffs. Problem solving can involve triggering switches to activate moving walls, or falling into “canons” that will shoot you upwards. In an interesting twist, a nefarious “Dark Cube” prowls select levels and makes trouble by triggering traps– but he can also trigger changes that will help you navigate the level’s environment, so you have to keep an eye on him.

The visuals in Edge Extended are simple, but frequently light up with impressive special effects. There is a small problem with dark environments being difficult to see when you’re playing in bright sunlight, and pale-surfaced levels can make it difficult to tell where you’re going. Luckily, each level is equipped with an easy-to-read map, so you won’t be inconvenienced once you learn how to use it.

The game’s soundtrack is pretty pumpin’, too: This is one game that you won’t want to substitute with your own playlist. The tracks are varied, with some providing techno beats while others pay homage to chiptunes.

If you’ve played Edge, then you know what to expect, and you should also buy Edge Extended with confidence. If you haven’t played Edge, you won’t have any trouble jumping directly into the Extended version. It’s not like you’re missing any vital story points, though if you hit up Fanfiction.net within the month, you’ll almost certainly see turbulent love stories starring Cube and Dark Cube.

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