Double Fine Productions to Make a New Adventure Game

If there was any doubt that the Kickstarter-financed graphic adventure title being made by Double Fine Productions was coming to iOS, Tim Schaefer has posted a video to squash that doubt. Since they’ve received so much funding, he says, the game will have full English voice acting and will be available for PC, Mac, Linux, iOS, and Android. There’s still no word on what the game will actually be about, however. Watch the video below for more information.

Last night Double Fine Productions, the studio helmed by legendary game creator Tim Schaefer, posted a Kickstarter project to fund a new graphic adventure game. For all you youngsters out there, the reason this is exciting is because Schaefer is responsible for classic adventure titles like Day of the Tentacle, Grim Fandango, and The Secret of Monkey Island. The project’s goal is to raise $400,000 over the next month, but in the hours since they posted the project they’ve already blown well past that amount. Watch the hilarious Kickstarter video below.

The finished adventure game will be available through Steam on the PC, but they note that if they raise more money than they’re asking for– which they’ve already done– they’ll make Mac and iOS versions of the game as well.

Double Fine Productions

In return for pledges, backers will receive rewards depending on the size of their pledge, from a copy of the finished game for a $15 pledge, all the way up to one of four shrink-wrapped copies of Day of the Tentacle if you pony up $150,000. Participants will also have access to a private online community, where they’ll be able to have a say in the game’s content and direction.

Also funded by the Kickstarter project will be a documentary of the game’s development process from start to finish. The documentary will be posted online in a serialized format as the game progresses. “Whether it all goes well, or it all goes to hell, we’re going to show everything,” says Schaefer.

Since the project already seems like a major success, we’re looking forward to watching the game’s development and playing the finished version, which is estimated to be available in October of this year. Perhaps more importantly, however, this experiment proves that there are more ways to fund game development than the typical “find a publisher and convince them to fund your project” route.